Jesus’ Financial Text of Terror

Here’s a small Biblical light on “Economic Justice” from a Mennonite perspective. In her sermon, “Jesus’ Financial Text of Terror“, Amy Yoder McGloughlin, pastor at Frazer Mennonite Church, Frazer, Pennsylvania, interprets Mark 10:17-31 as a lesson on Capitalism for us all.

— Robert

Here’s what is so problematic about this whole story, and probably why this text is not taken more seriously in Christian circles — In capitalism, redistributive justice is heresy. The justice that cares that all are fed, that all have what they need to live goes against the over-simplistic “pull yourself up by the bootstraps” philosophy of capitalism. But for Jesus in the Gospel of Mark, redestributive justice is the kingdom of God. So those of us who are rich have reason to be concerned by this text. If we take it seriously it has an important challenge for us.

www.storiesfromtheredtent.com/2018/10/17/jesus-financial-text-of-terror/

Autumn Crocus

Trans Faith and Faith Formation

Here is the VUU from 9/27/2018

We chatted live with Rev. Jaelynn Scott, Buddhist minister and UU religious educator, about trans faith and faith formation in Unitarian Universalism.

Rev. Jaelynn Scott is a Buddhist community minister who has served as the Director of Lifelong Learning at Woodinville Unitarian Universalist Church. A graduate of Naropa University’s Buddhist Divinity program, she was ordained by Ven.’s Bhante Chao Chu and Tampalawela Dhammaratana, and brings decades of dedicated meditation experience to her ministry.

The VUU streams live on Facebook every Thursday at 11 am ET. We talk social justice, Unitarian Universalism, religion, spirituality, and whatever else is topical and interesting!

Hosts: Meg Riley, Michael Tino, Aisha Hauser, and Christina Rivera; production support provided by Jessica Star Rockers.

The VUU is brought to you by the Church of the Larger Fellowship.

Blessed Rosh Hashanah

Rosh Hashanah ushers in the beginning of the Jewish year and is a holiday that celebrates the creation of the world, something that’s reflected in its name, which means “head of the year” in Hebrew.” From Time

Here is a video from the acapela group The Maccabeats

Blessings of peace for the New Year to all of our Jewish friends and family.

Namaste,

Cricket

 

 

 

Our Faith’s Complacency in Racism

“We have an absurd amount to learn, or unlearn, about race in this country. America allowed slavery to exist by seeking out personal and regional salvation at the expense of universal salvation. Our country felt better about itself because with the South as the identified patient, it never had to look at its own addiction.”

This reflection by Nathan Ryan is part of healing and of the work we need to be doing.

 

Photo Credit: UU World

 

New on Netflix: Come Sunday

I just heard about this on NPR and I was only casually listening.

“His story was the basis for a segment on the public radio program This American Life, and is now the subject of the new movie Come Sunday, now out via Netflix. (It stars Chiwetel Ejiofor, who we also talked to about his role.) Pearson says he wants Come Sunday to make people examine their faith:

“I just want them to rethink,” he says. “I want them to ask themselves: What do I believe and why do I believe it? What is the difference between what I believe in my head and know in my soul? Because I think there’s a difference.””

But there is a new movie on Netflix called Come Sunday which is about Carlton Pearson and his leaving a Pentecostal church. Here is an article by Ted Resnikoff

“Come Sunday, premiering on Netflix April 13, tells the story of how Bishop Carlton Pearson’s epiphany about God’s love cost him his congregation, affiliation with the Joint College of African-American Pentecostal Bishops, and a lot of money, but it only elliptically explains why he found a home for his faithful, and a place to minister and share his message of inclusion, at a Unitarian Universalist church.

Hope you get a chance to watch it.

Namaste,

Cricket