Sunday, July 19, 2020

Welcome:

Good morning and welcome to West Fork Unitarian Universalists. I’m Cricket and I feel blessed to serve this congregation as a lay leader. I’m glad to see all of you here today. 
Thank you for joining us. 

[If guests] I’d like to welcome our guests. Thank you for taking a chance and taking the time to walk through our doors and join us for worship. 

Let us use the prelude for centering. We are about to enter sacred time. We are about to make this time and this place sacred by our presence and intention. 
Please silence your phones… and as you do so, I invite us also to turn down the volume on our fears; to remove our masks; and to loosen the armor around our hearts. 
Breathe. 

Let go of the expectations placed on you by others—and those they taught you to place on yourself. 
Drop the guilt and the shame, not to shirk accountability, but in honest expectation of the possibility of forgiveness. 
Let go of the thing you said the other day. Let go of the thing you dread next week. Be here, in this moment. Breathe, here. 

Prelude: Lullabye (Goodnight my Angel) by Billy Joel

Opening Words: Come down off the ladder by David S Blanchard

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Report of the UUA Commission on Institutional Change

Widening the Circle of Concern

“The work of becoming more equitable, inclusive, and diverse within our congregations is justice work. If we cannot do this well, we cannot be effective as justice partners.

A frequent criticism of anti-oppression and hospitality work is that people are tired of us focusing internally, “navel-gazing,” rather than working on issues in the world. Yet greater awareness of the practices within our own institutions is complementary work to our justice. We cannot do accountable justice work if we are not able to remain in good relationship with those most affected by the conditions of injustice.”


Partners with Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival

I am excited to announce a new council of UU clergy and leaders from across the country, co-chaired by the Revs. Beth Johnson and Abhi Janamanchi, and gathered to support justice organizing with our partners at the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. I am so grateful to each council member for their commitment to moving organizing forward during this pandemic.

Learn more about council leadership online and get details on how to participate in upcoming digital mass meetings on April 30 and May 28. I look forward to being with all of you as we join our voices to say that everyone has a right to live!

Here is the article on UUA.org

Photo credit

Partners with Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival

I am excited to announce a new council of UU clergy and leaders from across the country, co-chaired by the Revs. Beth Johnson and Abhi Janamanchi, and gathered to support justice organizing with our partners at the Poor People’s Campaign: A National Call for Moral Revival. I am so grateful to each council member for their commitment to moving organizing forward during this pandemic.

Learn more about council leadership online and get details on how to participate in upcoming digital mass meetings on April 30 and May 28. I look forward to being with all of you as we join our voices to say that everyone has a right to live!

Here is the article on UUA.org

Photo credit

AN UPDATE ON GENERAL ASSEMBLY 2020

“A 100% virtual GA comes at a time when many UU congregations have embraced virtual meetings and virtual Sunday services. Although this pandemic has been challenging for many, a silver lining is that UUs are adapting to and seeing the value of incorporating technology into their religious lives. With so many UUs already online, this year’s GA could well be our highest-attended Unitarian Universalist gathering in history! It will be accessible to a more diverse and global audience. It will  also help reduce our carbon footprint, which aligns with our commitment to care for the earth and environment.”

More here – https://www.uua.org/pressroom/press-releases/woyaya-general-assembly-update

UU Lent 2020 – Day 1 – Prayer

In his essay “On Prayer,” Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel wrote:

“Prayer is meaningless unless it is subversive, unless it seeks to overthrow and to ruin the pyramids of callousness, hatred, opportunism, falsehood. The liturgical movement must become a revolutionary movement, seeking to overthrow the forces that continue to destroy the promise, the hope, and the vision.”

Our prayer this morning is “Sacred in the Ordinary” by Tamara Lebak