Sunday, February 2, 2020

“Power without love is reckless and abusive, and love without power is sentimental and anemic. Power at its best is love implementing the demands of justice, and justice at its best is power correcting everything that stands against love.” Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Join us for Worship: This week Cricket Hall will present a service about the history of The Beloved Community within Unitarian Universalism.

Our services are Sundays at 11 a.m.  at the Progressive Women’s Association Event Center, 305 Washington Ave. in downtown Clarksburg, behind the Courthouse. There are classes for children and adults 10 to 10:45 am, and a coffee gathering before the service. More about us.

Classes and worship are replaced by Spiritual Outings on the first Sunday of each month during the summer, with brief worship, a potluck picnic, and outdoor activities. The schedule is in the sidebar.

We would love to have you come worship with us.

Children are welcome.  There is childcare and an activity for young children during the service.

The building is wheelchair accessible, with an accessible restroom.

Map

The schedule for the current adult religious education class is here.

Email westforkuu@gmail.com or use our contact form for more information

or write to us at PO Box 523, Clarksburg WV 26302

Image Credit: Rafael Lopez (theispot.com)

The Corrosive and Malignant Danger of Remaining Silent About Racism

This was shared on the UUA’s facebook page this morning.

“Cowardice asks the question, ‘Is it safe?’ Expediency asks the question, ‘Is it politic?’ Vanity asks the question, ‘Is it popular?’ But, conscience asks the question, ‘Is it right?’ And there comes a time when one must take a position that is neither safe, nor politic, nor popular, but one must take it because one’s conscience tells one that it is right.” – Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

The Corrosive and Malignant Danger of Remaining Silent About Racism

1966 Ware Lecture: Don’t Sleep Through the Revolution, by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. | UUA.org

http://www.uua.org/ga/past/1966/ware

In 1966, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. gave the Ware Lecture at the UUA General Assembly. Here is a quote from the beginning of the speech, “The great question is, what do we do when we find ourselves in such a period? Certainly the church has a great responsibility because when the church is true to its nature, it stands as a moral guardian of the community and of society. It has always been the role of the church to broaden horizons, to challenge the status quo, and to question and break mores if necessary. I’m sure that we all agree that the church has a major role to play in this period of social change.”

We are still working. We are still fighting. We need to still be living our principles and working toward a vision of the world where all people are treated equally.

Namaste,
Cricket