Sunday, March 31, 2019

Prelude: Disappear From Dear Evan Hansen

Welcome: All of us are welcome here; all of us are loved By Erika A. Hewitt

Welcome Song:  “Enter Rejoice and Come in”

Chalice Lighting: Come we now out of the darkness By Annie Foerster

The Principles: Kidciples Song

The Story for All Ages:  You Will be Found from Dear Evan Hansen

Offering and Response   (Unison)

For the gifts which we have received—and the gifts which we, ourselves, are—may we be truly grateful. Yet more than that, may we be committed to using these gifts to make a difference in the world: to increase love and justice; to decrease hatred and oppression; to expand beloved community; to share, and to keep sharing, as long as ever we can. Amen.

Hymn: Blue Boat Home

Reading: On this Trans Day of Visibility by Rev. Susan Frederick-Gray

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Lent 2018 – Day 5 – Mercy

Mercy is defined in the dictionary as “compassion or forgiveness shown toward someone whom it is within one’s power to punish or harm.

What does Mercy mean to you? Is mercy something we do? Is mercy just for the Divine?

Here is some beautiful music to listen to while thinking about mercy.

Seeking Mercy, Seeking a Home by Erika Hewitt

May we learn mercy. May we breathe it in ourselves and breathe it out for others.

Namaste,

Cricket

3rd Sunday in Advent

Advent is the season of waiting. In the Christian year, it is the four Sundays before Christmas. Each Sunday there is a candle lit. They symbolize Love, Hope, Joy, and Peace. This week is about Joy. The reading below found on the UUA Worship Web is about waiting and Joy. What are we waiting for? What are we Joyful about?
Season’s Blessings,
Cricket
When Merry Meets Mess

“Use loneliness. Its ache creates urgency to reconnect with the world.”
— Natalie Goldberg

I know a little about “merry” meeting “mess” at the holidays — and by a little I mean How much time have you got?

Four Christmases ago, a painful break-up sent me spinning into a long tango with depression. Two Christmases ago, I came down with the stomach flu. Last year, as tears streamed down my face, friends cut off my long hair in preparation for my first round of chemotherapy. And this year? Like many, I’m grieving an election that, I believe, has already damaged the hearts and bodies of our country’s most fragile people.

I haven’t soured on the holidays, however — and I will not give up on Christmas — for two reasons.

First: long before my heart was broken and I lost my hair to chemo, I learned to shape the holidays to fit into whatever-shaped hole is in my heart.

At times, this has required ingenuity and vigilance. The holidays, laden as they are with traditions and sacred cows, can pull us into programmed ruts rather than genuine wonder. To ask, What do I truly need? and How can I claim my longing for joy? can happen only when we allow ourselves to practice vulnerability and take mindful pauses.

The other reason I won’t give up on Christmas is its central message: the Holy will never give up on us, her people. In fact, from Hanukkah to Solstice, that’s the message of most winter holy days: the Holy — call it God, call it The Force, call it Love’s Impulse — will never give up on us, even when we feel like curling up in a dark room and revoking our membership in the human family.

If I believe that your love will never let us go, I imagine saying to the Great All That Is, the least I can do is be your spy on the ground. I’ll keep watch for love, for compassion, for magic, for awe; and I’ll report back regularly, just to feel close to you.

Every one of you, Sugar Plums, has a story about the holiday blues: crisis, loneliness, wanting to give up. Telling our stories helps restore our wholeness. Tell yours. While you’re at it, form a plan for the coming weeks so that on the other side of this winter, you can look back  and say, “Here’s how I made it gentler on myself, and here’s where I remembered that love will show itself, again and again.”

Prayer

You reveal yourself to us in myriad ways, Gentlest of Ways, and at this time of the year you remind us that you’ll never turn away from us. Whether our hearts are merry or miserable, may our longing keep turning us toward you, and toward the presence of your Love among us.

Sunday October, 15, 2017

Prelude –  Medley of “Oh God Our Help in Ages Past” and “Come Holy Spirit”

Welcome–  Words of Welcome for a Difficult Morning By Erika A. Hewitt   

Welcome Song:  #361 “Enter Rejoice and Come In”

Chalice Lighting: Global Chalice Lighting for August 2017

Song #1It is Well with My Soul with  New lyrics by Kimberley Debus, 2009

Story for All Ages – Part of Unitarian Universalism is a Really Long Name by Jennifer Dant

Offering:  Quiet meditative moment with music

Song #2 – Hymn #318 We Would be One

Responsive Reading

Before we begin our responsive reading I would like to ask each of you, in your own way to join me in prayer.

As we read or watch the news each day and we see continued hate and violence, may we remember that we are not alone.  As our hearts break and we are faced with the reality that we have not come nearly as far as we need to, may we speak out. As others defend or explain away the problems facing our nation and our world, may we continue to encourage them to wake up. As we wonder if our ideals and expectations are doomed to fail, may remember that none of us are free until all of us are free. May we continue to answer the call of love and fight for the lives that need us most. May our voices continue to rise until they are heard above the hate.
May it Be,
Amen

We Answer the Call of Love By Julia Corbett-Hemeyer

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